Category: diy

Paper Octahedrons! (3D Diamonds) Free Silhouette Cut File

When my fiance and I started planning our wedding, we knew we wanted to DIY as much as possible. We’re having a laid back, cookout-style reception on my family’s property, so we decided to go for simple decor in lots of neutrals and select bright, bold colors.

Today I’m going to share with you my love for these simple yet bold 3d Paper Diamonds – or their mathematical term – Octahedrons.

Octahedrons01

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Knit a Dice Bag

I’m knitting dice bags to raise money for the Children’s Miracle Network during Extra Life on October 25th. Want to help me out? Please donate on my Extra Life page.


Making dice bags is incredibly simple. I used this Dice Bag pattern on Ravelry as a start, and after making a few, I’ve come up with my own recipe of sorts.

Multicolored Dice Bag

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Knit a Logo Hat!

My fiance is from Dallas originally and is a diehard Dallas Stars fan. So when they updated their official colors and logo, I knew I had to knit him a custom Dallas Stars hat.

The process of setting up your logo correctly can be a little tricky, but if you have some photo manipulation software experience (like Photoshop), you can figure it out. I also recommend learning Duplicate Stitch as opposed to trying to insartia knit the logo.

Follow along with a logo of your choice to knit your own custom logo hat!

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Creating Beaded Jewelry

If you haven’t already guessed, I’m a maker. A creator. A tinkerer. Friends hate going to craft fairs with me, as I’m constantly taking things apart in my mind, and figuring out how to make them. When I go to Target, I leave with a list full of things I want to recreate.

With that said, I love how-to sites. I’m a huge fan of DIY in all facets of life.

Yesterday I discovered Kris’s tutorial on Make This – the Patterned Fringe Beaded Necklace. Really great tutorial!

I created these:

I love being inspired by others’ great craftiness! :)

I love Austin

I love Austin, TX!
I love Austin, TX!

Make your own “I <3 This City” art with this photo tutorial. Use whatever materials you want! Paint, wood, fabric, cardboard, buttons… embrace that creativity and run with it!

 

Custom Earring Holder

I had an old frame lying around the house. It was missing glass and any hardware, and I’d painted it and put it in various places around my house. So I made an earring holder!

IMG_5280-764x1024I used Size 7 needles, Crochet thread, and a 5-pattern-repeat of the Dainty Chevron pattern, found on KnittingFool.com.

I knit until it was about as long as the frame opening, then I bound off and attached the lace to the frame via staple gun. A helpful hint – staple gun the center of each side, then work around equally – that way you don’t end up with your lace cockeyed inside your frame.

You could use any lace pattern, and size frame, and any size yarn! Definitely do a gauge check so you don’t end up with a lace piece way too big or too small for your frame. (Too big wouldn’t be as bad as too small, though.)

Customized Knitting Needles!

The other day I realized that I’ve been knitting for almost 7 years! I had this realization while trying to find the twin to my US7 straight bamboo needle, and being frustrated with the lack of organization in the 7-years worth of knitting needles I’ve collected. And why are the sizes engraved with tiny little numbers on the side of the needle, where they’ll eventually wear off with use?

Suddenly inspiration struck. I should label my needles on the top, and add a bit of color while I’m at it!

Here are the steps to make your own customized knitting needles!

  • Step 1: Set up your work space. I placed a scrap piece of cardboard on top of 2 sawhorses so that I could stick my needles through the cardboard, keeping them secure, making them easier to paint, and giving them a safe place to dry. I also used a pegboard to keep things organized, but that’s not at all required.
  • Step 2: Arrange your needles by their size, and stick them through the cardboard. I used the screwdriver to poke the holes for the skinnier needles, since I was worried I might break them while trying to jab them through the cardboard.
  • Step 3: Paint! I used acrylic paint and a basic old paintbrush. (Because I’m a color nerd, I found a color palette I liked from colourlovers, saved it on my phone, and used it to pick out my paints.) I painted 3 coats total, because I wanted to make sure I had excellent coverage. Acrylic paint dries SUPER fast, so 3 coats of paint was easy to do. I found the easiest strategy was to spin the needle from under the cardboard, and brush from bottom to top of the needle “bead” until all sides were painted, then finished with a brush or two on the top.
  • Step 4: Once your paint is dry, use a sharpie to write the needle sizes on the top. I also thought of using a sticker or a stencil, but at this point I just wanted to finish them, so I just used the sharpie.
  • Step Oops! (Not Suggested) Accidentally grab a can of black spray paint instead of the clear coat, and spray black speckles all over your beautiful needles. Immediately stop and freak out. Curse at things. Take a break and grab a beer. Inspect the damage. Decide your needles aren’t ruined. Move onto step 6.
  • Step 6: (Definitely suggested) Use a satin or gloss finish spray clear coat (I used satin finish, just because that’s what I had). You should only need one coat, but make sure to spray from all sides to get everything covered.
  • Step 7: Let dry. I left mine in the garage overnight, but they probably don’t need that long. Throw all your needles in a pretty container, and revel in your awesome creativity!

Other ideas I had included to label the side of the needle “bead” and glue something pretty on the top, like a button, or a plastic or fabric flower, or a bow… Pretty much anything you can think of!

I’m still trying to figure out what to do with my circulars and DPNs. Who has some ideas?

Getting labels off wine/beer bottles

I don’t remember where I found this tip (once I do, I’ll link to the site), but I’ve discovered the best way to remove labels from wine and beer bottles. Not only is the label salvageable, but the stickiness of any leftover glue residue is easily removable with water and a brush or some Goo Gone.

The key: The oven, on bake, at about 175 degrees. Preheat your oven, pop in your glass bottles, and let them get warm/hot – I’ve found about 10 minutes works best. Then remove the bottle – with an oven mitt! – find the corner of your label, and peel. The heat should have melted the glue, and the label should peel off easily. You can now stick the label to a piece of paper or something else (stick it on wax paper to save it for another project).

I used this process on 3 bottles yesterday, and all my labels came off perfectly! 

Pictures to come… once I get around to taking them. :)

to anyone hosting a webinar

A couple pieces of advice…

  • Do a dry-run of your webinar a couple days beforehand, with test participants (your family, friends, coworkers, roommates, whatever). Figure out how to advance your slides, and what your participants will see during the presentation, and how you sound to them, how to allow others to talk or have control over the slides, etc. Don’t figure these things out during your “live” teleseminar.
  • Slides are free. Don’t put EVERYTHING you’re trying to talk about on one slide. Make it several slides. Use as little text as possible. If your slides are boring or too text-y, I’m going to be doing something else (ahem, blogging) while you’re talking.  (OMG If you ever find yourself saying “You might not be able to see that too clearly” then you should not use it on your slide.)
  • Send out a copy of your slides to attendees and have an archive of the webinar available by the next day, at the latest.
  • You don’t need your logo & website on every.single.slide. When you send out the copy of your slides, you can put it in there as a footer. But you really don’t need it on every slide. It’s annoying.
  • Stick to a color palette. Use like images. Use 1 font – maybe 2. Use large fonts. Don’t use Comic Sans.
  • Spell out acronyms.
  • You don’t have to write out everything you’re going to say – that’s why you’re saying it. If I can get the same information just by reading your slides, then you’ve written too much.
  • Host the webinar from a quiet space. Yes, we can hear the people in your office giggling in the background.